Category: The Writing Life

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Of Music and Poetry: Questions for Peter Norman

by E. Martin Nolan

E Martin Nolan interviews recent Puritan contributor Peter Norman on the ways he makes his poetry sing. 

EMN: How do you conceive of the musicality in your poems? Do you deliberately inject a certain idea or strategy of musicality into them, or is it more natural,

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Anthony de Sa Suffuses Lisbon with Little Portugal

by Phoebe Wang

It’s nearly impossible to imagine Toronto’s west end, especially along Dundas and the Brockton and Bloordale areas, without its Portuguese bakeries, markets and houseware shops. In the mid-1950s, migrants fleeing the regime of António de Salazar began settling in Toronto, and Brazilian and Angolese have since added to Canada’s largest concentration of Portuguese-speaking migrants.

Yet how familiar are we with Portuguese literature?

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In Praise of the Blatantly Poetic—P.P.S: Do You Copy?

by E. Martin Nolan

There’s been another argument. About lyrics, I think. Involving someone named Major Perloff? A sniper? At least very selective and narrow in scope. Also involving obnoxious suits and imprecise talk of “poetic capital”? Archivists who think they’re the first person to find out it’s weird to transcribe spoken or recorded language talking down to poets like they didn’t already know that?

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“There Was a Void of Good, Long Form Sports Writing:” Questions for Mike Spry of The Barnstormer

by E. Martin Nolan

The-Round-BusTHE BARNSTORMER is a literary sports journal that was founded in May of 2012 by Andrew Forbes, Bryan Jay Ibeas, Ian Orti, and Mike Spry. It aims to celebrate the intersection of sports and humanity with good writing. It means to be an open, accommodating, inclusive forum for considered,

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Laura Clarke and Suzannah Showler up for the 2013 Bronwen Wallace Award

by The Puritan Editors

Despite being founded in 1620, The Puritan prides itself on its voyages into the literary frontier. Age doesn’t matter in this regard—P.K. Page was knocking socks off posthumously—but it naturally falls to the young to reinvent the wheel, overcome dumb bigotries, reinvigorate a national literature, etc. The problem is that you usually get recognized for that latter task well after the work is done—if you’re lucky.

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Beth Follett on Jan Zwicky’s The Book of Frog: A Way of Discussing the World

by Phoebe Wang

With a book such as Jan Zwicky’s recent The Book of Frog, released by Newfoundland’s Pedlar Press, many readers will wonder how it came about. The book is slim, perfect-bound, beautifully printed, has a pleasing light-green cover, and is adorned with images and diagrams within. The short prose work also marks a shift from the works of poetry and philosophy that Zwicky has published during her long,

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The Unseen Role of the Editor

by Jessica Bebenek

I’m writing a novel… kind of.

I’ve been editing my partner’s novel as he writes it, slowly, chapter by chapter over the past year. Naturally, the question of what role editors play in a work can’t help but pop up. As is the case with the under-populated group of book reviewers, editors are often writers in disguise,

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Short Story Month – Taking Advice from Usher

by Andrew F. Sullivan

It is Short Story Month and we will all be paying lip service to that fact. There will be screeds bemoaning how collections are ignored by popular readers, celebrations of online publishers revitalizing the form and loud whispers about traditional publishers abandoning collections in favour of novels again and again. Each year it seems to be a perpetual underdog story and the narrative rarely changes.

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Treading in the Wake of Nicholas Hoare, and Learning from that Venerable Store

by Shaun A. Hogan

Nicholas Hoare, that embarrassment of writerly riches, is gone. And it’s a shame. The store had an air of manicured style, which is to say it was really nice inside—and while it’s heartening to know that its closure was speeded by Mr. Hoare’s retirement and not by rent hikes or tax bills,