Category: The Writing Life

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Holy Wild and Poetry as a Mediator

by Gwen Benaway

Gwen Benaway participates in Canisia Lubrin’s (Dis)Order: The Single Question Series on the theme of convergence in her work. Gwen Benaway’s third book, Holy Wild, is forthcoming from BookThug in 2018.

Q: Writing converges different forms of knowing in ways that allow for the possibilities of knowledge to become particularly expansive because this seems to require listening for what is unknown to us.

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Failing at the Task

by Simone Dalton

As part of Canisia Lubrin’s (Dis)Order: The Single Question Series, Simone Dalton answers a single question about her work.

Q: Writing converges different forms of knowing in ways that allow for the possibilities of knowledge to become particularly expansive because this seems to require listening for what is unknown to us.

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Creative Visualization

by Priscila Uppal

As part of Canisia Lubrin’s (Dis)Order: The Single Question Series, Priscila Uppal answers a single question about her work.

I always thought I listened to my body. I’m an extremely active person; some consider me an athlete. I produce a lot of creative work because I listen to my internal and external rhythms to formulate routines of activity that allow for beneficial efficiency in physical as well as creative realms.

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Confluence and Convergence

by John Robert Lee

As part of Canisia Lubrin’s (Dis)Order: The Single Question Series, John Robert Lee answers a single question about his work.

Q: Writing converges different forms of knowing in ways that allow for the possibilities of knowledge to become particularly expansive because this seems to require listening for what is unknown to us.

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Convergent Evolution

by Allison LaSorda

As part of Canisia Lubrin’s (Dis)Order: The Single Question Series, Allison LaSorda answers a single question about her work.

Q: Writing converges different forms of knowing in ways that allow for the possibilities of knowledge to become particularly expansive because this seems to require listening for what is unknown to us.

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“I Don’t Believe in Writer’s Block”

by Mark Jordan Manner

As part of Canisia Lubrin’s (Dis)Order: The Single Question Series, Mark Jordan Manner answers a single question about his work.

Q: Writing converges different forms of knowing in ways that allow for the possibilities of knowledge to become particularly expansive because this seems to require listening for what is unknown to us.

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Author Note: Jill Talbot

by Jill Talbot

Jill Talbot is the author of two poems, “A Towel’s Life” and “Ontology of Dreams,” in The Puritan’s Summer 2016 issue, poetry edited by Sonnet L’Abbé. For The Town Crier’s ongoing Author Notes series, here she talks about her writing process.

Sometimes I have to step out and look at a flower,

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Taking English for a Spin

by Dominique Bernier-Cormier

I’ve never had sex in French. I’ve never done drugs in French. On the other hand, I’ve never cracked a lobster or broken a bone in English. I recite the alphabet in French, but I swear in English. I can never tell which language I dream in. I live parts of my life in my mother tongue,

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Stan Dragland’s Art of Englishing

by Guadalupe Muro

It was not even 2:15 p.m. but of course Stan Dragland was already there, sitting at a table next to the window at the Starbucks on the corner of College and Beatrice. It was April 15, 2014 and we were supposed to meet at 2:30 p.m. As I walked toward him I felt an overwhelming feeling of joy as I suddenly realized: it’s happening,

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Fear No Man

by Eric Foley

My grandfather calls an ambulance a take-’em-away. He calls a cemetery a dead feet. He calls his cottage the fishbone, as in: “Have you driven up all the way to the … fishbone, before?” To which I answer, “Yes.”

The backs of his hands are hard and dark purple from the blood thinners he’s been on for 40 years,