Category: Reviews

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Sequential Gestures: Reading Cameron Anstee

by Bardia Sinaee

The Town Crier is proud to present the following essay from Puritan contributor Bardia SinaeeBardia’s poem “Etobicoke” was featured in Issue 20 of The PuritanThe following is a survey of Apt. 9 Press founder Cameron Anstee’s poetry to date.

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A Review of Melissa Bull’s Rue

by Jason Freure

You can still be lost even when you know exactly where you’re standing. That’s the takeaway of Melissa Bull’s Rue, a debut poetry collection grounded in a story about growing up, making mistakes, and coping with those mistakes your parents made, all the while wandering through Montreal’s boroughs.

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Excursions in the Art of Lying

by John Nyman

When derek beaulieu says, “please, no more poetry,” Daniel Scott Tysdal’s Fauxccasional Poems may seem like the last place to turn for a response. Playful, dense, and brilliantly executed in line with a variety of well-established (and difficult!) poetic forms, it’s as easy to read Tysdal’s work as a master craftsman’s homage to poetry as it has always been.

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undun and Poetry Beyond Print

by E Martin Nolan

The common thinking goes: Poetry is like our civilization’s aging relative no one ever really cared about, but who everyone feels obligated to visit once a year, or at least to send a card. Even if we’ve never been moved to love this relative, we don’t want them totally forgotten. They may be a charity case—totally unable to support themselves in a market economy—but they have dignity and history on their side.

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Feeling Postmodern, Failing Postmodern

by John Nyman

When I first picked up Edward Nixon’s debut poetry collection, The Fissures of Our Throats (Guernica Editions, 2014), I feared the book would bury itself taking a too-familiar stance in the all-but-exhausted debate around lyric identity, its denouncement by certain postmodern avant-gardes, and the ever-contentious role of “theory.” As an author,

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Two Books About Flowers

by Jason Freure

Looking at the body of a headless Cloten, Shakespeare’s Imogen says, “These flowers are like the pleasures of the world; this bloody man, the care on’t.” Flowers are one of the oldest images of metaphor. They stand in for spiritual, aristocratic, environmental, and romantic meanings. Shakespeare uses them extensively, but in the same breath,

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Timezone of Some Desperate Hour

by Domenica Martinello

Patriarchal European settlers were shocked by the egalitarian nature of many First Nations peoples, mistaking a lack of hierarchal structure for primitiveness and chaos. One of the epigraphs to Liz Howard’s debut collection, Infinite Citizen of the Shaking Tent—simply, “so violent an ecstasy”is a quote from Paul LeJeune,

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Bums, Bikers, and Tattoo Parlours

by Jason Freure

Chroniques du Centre-Sud, Richard Suicide’s latest graphic novel, documents the residents and businesses that characterized the decrepit heart of Montreal’s le Centre-Sud in the late ’80s. In this archive, the area around the corner of rue Dorion and Ontario has more tattoo parlours than bars and more bars than grocery stores,

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Kisses of Acadian and Gobs of Québécois

by Tyler Willis

This post originally appeared on The Town Crier on April 12, 2014, five days after the Québec general election of 2014 gave Phillipe Couillard’s federalist Liberal Party a majority government. It was a response to Denise Duhamel’s poem, “Zou Bisou Bisou.”

When Megan Draper sang “Zou Bisou Bisou” on Mad Men,