Category: Music

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Author Notes: Scott Nolan

by Scott Nolan

Two of Scott Nolan’s poems, Elvis and me” and “Ten above tomorrow”, were published in Issue 30 of  The Puritan. 

I started writing poetry in January 2015, approximately three weeks after my 40th birthday. The plan was to replace smoking cigarettes with walking eight to ten kilometres a day.

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Author Notes: Randy Lundy

by Randy Lundy

Randy Lundy’s poem,“An Ecology of Being and Non-Being,” appeared in Issue 30 of The Puritan. Here he speaks with The Town Crier about drawing inspiration from memory, and shares some of his favourite literature and music. 

“An Ecology of Being and Non-Being” began as most of my recent writing has: in my backyard or from the desire to be in my backyard,

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undun and Poetry Beyond Print

by E Martin Nolan

The common thinking goes: Poetry is like our civilization’s aging relative no one ever really cared about, but who everyone feels obligated to visit once a year, or at least to send a card. Even if we’ve never been moved to love this relative, we don’t want them totally forgotten. They may be a charity case—totally unable to support themselves in a market economy—but they have dignity and history on their side.

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“A Lotta Prada”

by Tracy Kyncl

How do you “share a brainwave” or find yourself upon the “same wavelength” with someone else? Well, to start, you could be so syncopated in your thoughts and behaviours that you begin to echo each other’s  preconceptions of reality. Or, more likely, you’ve been so bombarded with the same image that you can’t help but adopt it into your worldview.

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Drake: The Master Marketer of Toronto

by E Martin Nolan

Drake’s not much of a rapper. At best, his lame auto-tune hooks piggy-back on better rappers’ work in the verses. He’s a brand and an advertiser more than an artist. But what does that mean for Toronto, the city which he’s consistently promoting? Cynically, one could argue that Drake’s promotion of Toronto is simply a shrewd marketing ploy: it’s a major city without a major star representing it.

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Rebels, Bombs, Duende

by Jason Freure

About two-thirds of the way through Jim Smith’s 2012 book of poetry from Mansfield Press, Happy Birthday, Nicanor Parra—I think it was around “Christ, Elqui” and “Risk Analysis of a Poem”—it hit me: if you’re going to write poetry at all, you might as well write whatever you want. The payout just isn’t worth the compromise in such a low revenue,

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Bob Dylan, Dionne Brand, Louise Carson and the Written-Sung Word

by E. Martin Nolan

We’ve been looking into the tricky role poetry plays when incorporated into music. So far, I don’t think we’ve adequately defined that role. That is appropriate, because what little investigation we have done has suggested that poetry’s role in music should be studied on a case by case basis, and that “tricky” is probably the most important word in any overarching definition of that role.

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Lyrics Inside a Cage of Sound: Sir John Betjeman on Daft Punk

by E. Martin Nolan

The fourth in a series on music lyrics. Read Jessica Bebenek’s entry here, Peter Norman’s here, and Kevin Hardcastle’s here.

Now that I mention it, is Daft Punk’s “Get Lucky” stuck in your head? And when you engage that funky fairy in your mind’s ear,

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Of Music and Fiction: Questions for Kevin Hardcastle

by Kevin Hardcastle

Recent contributor Kevin Hardcastle discusses components of his process as a writer. You can taste the fruits of his labour in Issue XXI: Spring 2013 of The Puritan.

The Puritan: Did music lyrics have anything to do with the piece we’re publishing?

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Of Music and Poetry: Questions for Peter Norman

by E. Martin Nolan

E Martin Nolan interviews recent Puritan contributor Peter Norman on the ways he makes his poetry sing. 

EMN: How do you conceive of the musicality in your poems? Do you deliberately inject a certain idea or strategy of musicality into them, or is it more natural,