Category: Interview

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Visioning Poetry and Activism

by E Martin Nolan and Jillian Harkness

E Martin Nolan and Jillian Harkness ask the authors of Decomp about poetry and activism and how harming the earth might just be human.

TC: Where the language of poetry is often regarded for its multiplicity of meanings and ability to express complex experience, the language of activism is assumed to be much more rhetorical and direct.

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On Geoffrey Alexander Parsons

by Jason Freure

In the last part of our two part interview, Jason Price Everett talks about how literature has been priced out of American society and the death of writer and friend, Geoffrey Alexander Parsons.

Jason Freure: “Bone Folder” is a prose poem dedicated to the memory of Geoffrey Alexander Parsons,

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Microliteratures and Travelogues

by Jason Freure

Jason Freure: First of all, you write in your travelogue, Xian Dyad, “A sincere and true travelogue undresses the traveller and masks the places travelled.” Why did you write a travelogue, and what elements of travel did you uncover or unmask?

Jason Price Everett: When I first decided to spend a year in China teaching English,

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Cryptozoology and Life Working in the Gallery: An Interview with Nina Berkhout

by Julienne Isaacs

Nina Berkhout is the author of five poetry collections, most recently Elseworlds, which won the 2013 Archibald Lampman Award. Originally from Calgary, Alberta, she now lives in Ottawa, Ontario. The Gallery of Lost Species (House of Anansi), set for release this January, is her first novel.

Julienne Isaacs: You have a degree in Classical Studies and another degree in Museum Studies.

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Four Questions with Roxanna Bennett

by Domenica Martinello

Roxanna Bennett published a review of Jon Paul Fiorentino’s I’m Not Scared of You or Anything in Issue 26, Summer 2014. Her debut collection of poems, The Uncertainty Principle (2014), will be reviewed on The Town Crier next month.

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“I Owe It To the Book”: Angie Abdou on Marketing and Self-Promotion

by Julienne Isaacs

Angie Abdou is the author of the short story collection Anything Boys Can Do (2006), the 2011 Canada Reads finalist, The Bone Cage (2007), The Canterbury Trail (2011) and, most recently, Between (2014).

Julienne Isaacs: You have been published with a variety of small presses—Thistledown,

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“Such a Fascinating Symbiotic Ecosystem”: An Interview with the Creators of ChessBard

by E Martin Nolan

This interview follows up on a post from last month about the digital poetry generator ChessBard. It was conducted over email.

E Martin Nolan: I suck at chess. But the poem I made by playing the ChessBard intrigues me. The first time I “poetified” the game, the poem ended with the line, 

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Two Questions for Puritan Contributor Stevie Howell

by E Martin Nolan

Stevie Howell published three poems in Issue 25, Spring 2014, and read at The Puritan’s Black Friday this year.

E. Martin Nolan: Your book contains an impressive poetic range. Formally, there are free verse poems spread across the page (or two pages in the case of “Avenue Road”);

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“Vibrantly Different Everywhere”: Matthew R. Loney on the Western Traveller

by E Martin Nolan

Matthew R. Loney is a writer based in Toronto, Canada. As a graduate of the University of Toronto’s M.A. in Creative Writing program (2009) and avid traveler, he has combined these passions into a collection of short stories, That Savage Water.

E Martin Nolan: That Savage Water focuses around traveller-adventurers,

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A Warning to Toronto Writers: Networks Don’t Make Literature

by Julienne Isaacs

It doesn’t matter where you live: being human is difficult. The writer’s task is to transcribe the difficulty.

On a recent trip to Toronto, I was told half a dozen times by both strangers and friends that nothing would aid my career more than a move to that great Canadian literary Mecca. For a few days I waffled,