Category: Interview

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“A Book to Defy Authority”

by Oona Patrick

Scholar and poet Ana Luísa Amaral on the effort to return the Three Marias’ daring mixed-genre work to its rightful place in the Portuguese canon.

New Portuguese Letters was written by three Portuguese women in 1971, including Maria Teresa Horta, whose poems appear in the supplement to issue 25 of The Puritan.

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“You Need To Take Everyone In”:

by Jess Taylor

Alexandra Oliver understands people. As a poet and author of Meeting the Tormentors in Safeway,  she’s developed a keen ear for other voices and represents people from all walks of life: the preschooler, the old man, the rebel, or even strangers in the laundromat.

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Poetry, Prose, & Taking It Shift by Shift

by E Martin Nolan

It’s a busy time for past-Puritan authors: no fewer than 10 of their books are being published this spring. So we decided to check in on them and ask them one question each. First up: Chris Hutchinson, Peter Norman, Suzannah Showler, and Mike Spry. Stay tuned for more.

Chris Hutchinson’s A Brief History of the Short-Lived was reviewed in Issue 19 of The Puritan.

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“To Me, All Poetry is Political”:

by Tracy Kyncl

It’s only been two weeks into National Poetry Month and Toronto is in a flurry. Awash with events and brimming with excitement, bards, readers, and critics have busied themselves buying debut collections or reflecting on the place of poetry in their lives.

As I’ve immersed myself in the hubbub I’ve noticed that poetry,

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“Stretching the Space of Realism”:

by Nicole R. Grimaldi

Author Kathryn Kuitenbrouwer discusses enchantment, realism, and the local politics of her newest novel All The Broken Things. The following is a teaser of a much longer, more in depth conversation scheduled for publication in Issue 26: Summer 2014 of The Puritan.

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“Anyone Can Write Themselves into Visibility, but Who Reads It?”

by Jess Taylor

Oakland poet Stephanie Young, who recently released Ursula or University with Krupskaya, answered questions for The Town Crier based on her essay, “In Which Metaphors For Poetry Communities, and For Writing About Them, Abound.” Last month, we featured Part One of the interview.

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One Thing Changes Another

by Jess Taylor

While researching for an upcoming Puritan essay on literary community, Oakland poet Stephanie Young’s work proved invaluable to me. In her recent collection of essays and poems, Ursula or University, as well the introduction of Bay Area Poetics, which she edited, Young explores the concept of community, while also looking into literary,

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Earth in the Books

by Jillian Harkness

Jillian Harkness’s interview with Stephen Collis and Jordan Scott (on their latest collaboration, Decomp) will appear in The Puritan, Issue 24: Winter 2014.

For the wanderer doesn’t bring back from the mountainside
to the valley a handful of earth, unsayable to everyone,

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“Poetry Communities Are Elemental to My Life”

by Jess Taylor

Writers on Their Communities: The First in a Series. 

This interview was conducted as part of Jess Taylor’s research into literary communities on both sides of The US-Canadian Border. That research has gone into an essay that will appear in The Puritan later this year.