Category: Ephemera

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The Appeal of the Personal

by Kathryn Stagg

There’s a story from my childhood that I keep trying to write, each time attempting to get a little bit closer to describing what I’ve since lost, and each time getting a little bit further away from what the story once was. Personal writing today is enjoying unprecedented popularity. Not only do literary bestsellers like Karl Ove Knausgaard and Maggie Nelson engage extensively with the personal,

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Hot and Bothered: Or, How I Fell In and Out of Love With Poetic Conceptualism

by Kate Siklosi

The following piece concludes the month-long series “Conscientious Conceptualism and Poetic Practice” on the blog, curated by guest editor Andy Verboom.

“The best PT [Poetic Terrorism] is against the law …”

—Hakim Bey

As a young student of poetics—a bushy-tailed, full-of-piss-and-vinegar-and-linguistic-angst youngster—I was immediately drawn to the classics of conceptual poetry,

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“Seeing Splits” and Writing “Humanness”: Questions for Doyali Islam on Concept, Form, and Process

by E Martin Nolan

The following piece appears as part of the month-long series “Conscientious Conceptualism and Poetic Practice” on the blog, curated by guest editor Andy Verboom.

E Martin Nolan: In this month’s series on ‘conscientious conceptualism,’ one of the focuses has been the consequences of the formal choices that poets make.

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Conceptualism in the Resistance

by Jacqueline Valencia

The following piece appears as part of the month-long series “Conscientious Conceptualism and Poetic Practice” on the blog, curated by guest editor Andy Verboom.

Since 2015, I’ve been asked to write and talk about cultural appropriation in conceptual poetry. These requests began after I wrote a few blog posts in response to conceptual poets who had problematically appropriated work that year.

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Speaking of “Lyric Conceptualism”: Space, Time, and the Travelling “I”

by Kevin Shaw and Andy Verboom

The following piece appears as part of the month-long series “Conscientious Conceptualism and Poetic Practice” on the blog, curated by guest editor Andy Verboom.

Andy Verboom: When I think about the relations among conceptual, lyric, and formal poetic practices, I have a foggy Venn diagram in mind. Certain techniques,

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White and Conceptual

by John Nyman

The following piece appears as part of the month-long series “Conscientious Conceptualism and Poetic Practice” on the blog, curated by guest editor Andy Verboom.

What is conceptualism? For at least the last few years, it has been difficult to answer this question without betraying a certain bias, or at least a certain perspective or ‘take.’ For many,

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Waiting for Good: Transgression, Down-shouting, and Ethical Readership

by Shane Neilson

The following piece appears as part of the month-long series “Conscientious Conceptualism and Poetic Practice” on the blog, curated by guest editor Andy Verboom.

Kenneth Goldsmith’s infamous performance of Michael Brown’s body is, well, stupid and wrong but is also, I think, something that can be generative. I didn’t like the performance,

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“Responsibility to the Word” et al.: Four Lessons Derek Walcott Didn’t Mean to Teach Me about Conceptualism

by Andy Verboom

The following piece appears as part of the month-long series “Conscientious Conceptualism and Poetic Practice” on the blog, curated by guest editor Andy Verboom.

1. I am responsible to others and responsible for my words.

This is one thing I learned from late-great formalist poet Derek Walcott—despite his best pulpit thunder on the poet’s “responsibility to the word”—and it’s a lesson that has come to inform my understanding of Conceptual poetics.

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Writing (About) Other People: Notional Ekphrasis and Parafiction in the Hospital Gift Shop

by Trevor Abes

The following piece appears as part of the month-long series “Conscientious Conceptualism and Poetic Practice” on the blog, curated by guest editor Andy Verboom.

As a writer who nerds out on visual and performance art but who can’t paint, draw, sculpt, or act for shit, I’ve devised a book project provisionally titled The New Frontiers of Conceptual Art.