Category: Ephemera

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Failing at the Task

by Simone Dalton

As part of Canisia Lubrin’s (Dis)Order: The Single Question Series, Simone Dalton answers a single question about her work.

Q: Writing converges different forms of knowing in ways that allow for the possibilities of knowledge to become particularly expansive because this seems to require listening for what is unknown to us.

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Creative Visualization

by Priscila Uppal

As part of Canisia Lubrin’s (Dis)Order: The Single Question Series, Priscila Uppal answers a single question about her work.

I always thought I listened to my body. I’m an extremely active person; some consider me an athlete. I produce a lot of creative work because I listen to my internal and external rhythms to formulate routines of activity that allow for beneficial efficiency in physical as well as creative realms.

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(Dis)order: No/Know/Known/Knowing/Knowingly

by Rasiqra Revulva

As part of Canisia Lubrin’s (Dis)Order: The Single Question Series, Rasiqra Revulva answers a single question about her work.

Q: Writing converges different forms of knowing in ways that allow for the possibilities of knowledge to become particularly expansive because this seems to require listening for what is unknown to us.

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Confluence and Convergence

by John Robert Lee

As part of Canisia Lubrin’s (Dis)Order: The Single Question Series, John Robert Lee answers a single question about his work.

Q: Writing converges different forms of knowing in ways that allow for the possibilities of knowledge to become particularly expansive because this seems to require listening for what is unknown to us.

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Convergent Evolution

by Allison LaSorda

As part of Canisia Lubrin’s (Dis)Order: The Single Question Series, Allison LaSorda answers a single question about her work.

Q: Writing converges different forms of knowing in ways that allow for the possibilities of knowledge to become particularly expansive because this seems to require listening for what is unknown to us.

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“I Don’t Believe in Writer’s Block”

by Mark Jordan Manner

As part of Canisia Lubrin’s (Dis)Order: The Single Question Series, Mark Jordan Manner answers a single question about his work.

Q: Writing converges different forms of knowing in ways that allow for the possibilities of knowledge to become particularly expansive because this seems to require listening for what is unknown to us.

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(Dis)Order: The Single Question Series

by Canisia Lubrin

In a little over a month, my first book, Voodoo Hypothesis, will be published. I had set myself to the task of joining my beguilements and doubts in an act of poetic investigation into the contemporary experience of Black otherness in the West through variously intersecting systems of value, belief,

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Afterthoughts on a Month of Songwriting Critique

by Daniel Kincade Renton

Our contributors this month have offered a productive and nuanced multi-part conversation about the criticism of songwriting (or of lyrical song, as one article put it), and how it might be something new, different, or greater than the sum of either music or literary criticism individually. The articles come in a pleasing variety of forms.

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Words and Music in Composition

by Jenny Berkel

When I was 21, I wrote my first song in a giant and nearly empty apartment in downtown Winnipeg. I grew up singing and writing poetry, but it wasn’t until I was alone in that echoing apartment that I realized I could do both things at once. Since that realization, I have spent countless hours hunched over a desk with a guitar and a pen.

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Theses on the Criticism of Popular Songwriting

by David Janzen and Andy Verboom

An emphasis on form produces a discourse specific to (and adequate to) the object—whether the object is a poem, a lyrical song, or an instrumental song.

We agree with Daniel Renton’s claim, in the first piece in this Town Crier series, that “song writing warrants its own discourse.” But we think that claim proceeds to beg the question: “As a synthesis of words and music,