Category: Ephemera

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Jigsaw Noir

by Jason Freure

Cory McCallum and Matthew Daley’s noir world starts off like any other: a city of dark towers in the middle of a heatwave, and something big is going on that nobody can solve but a rough-around-the-edges private investigator. The Pig Sleep features Mr. Monitor, a monitor lizard in a sleuthing hat,

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Why Bother, Bernardo Soares?

by André Babyn

The lyrics of alt-rock band Weezer are famously dreamy: they helped inaugurate a generation of teenagers who would rather fret and delay than act. Collectively these teens would come to be known as “emo,” short for “emotional”—in other words, a bunch of passive crybabies (not that there’s anything wrong with that). While attending all-female cover band Sheezer’s annual Hallowe’en show at Lee’s Palace last Thursday,

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ECW: A Little Out of the Ordinary

by Tracy Kyncl

With the International Festival of Authors on the horizon, it seems logical for presses to launch their wackiest and most unique books to grab readers’ attention. On October 21st, 2013 I attended the Wolsak and Wynn launch at The Steady where they were celebrating the release of some uncommon titles.

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Author Note: Meg Johnson

by Meg Johnson

Recent Puritan contributor Meg Johnson discusses the composition of her poem, “American Woman,” in Issue XXII: Summer 2013 of The Puritan.

I wrote “American Woman” when I was visiting my parents in Ames, Iowa, which is where I grew up.

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Why “Why are we surprised by David Gilmour”?

by Andy Verboom

It seems two questions occupy the same space: “Why are ‘we,’ who knew (of) Gilmour, surprised that he is consistently misogynist?” and “Why are ‘we,’ who knew nothing of Gilmour, surprised that there is such a person participating in Canadian literature and in the Canadian literary education system?” In both cases, I wager, we aren’t.

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Television-Themed Halloween Costumes for Literary Figures, Living and Dead

by André Babyn

Douglas Coupland

Costume: Brent Butt’s bank account

Douglas Coupland once chewed paper currency into mush in order to construct synthetic replicas of insect nests. He’s also responsible for a giant canoe installed near the Gardiner Expressway and a book on Terry Fox. Coupland’s art project might have lowered inflation an infinitesmal amount by decreasing the real supply of money (if he hadn’t chewed American currency)—but he would have more than made up for this by decreasing our nation’s capital through reckless overspending on Canadian schmaltz. 

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Local Publishers Launch Their Fall Lineups

by Tracy Kyncl

After a great time at the BookThug launch, I headed over to The Garrison for the Coach House launch on Thursday, October 3rd. Despite the fact that I arrived half an hour early to an empty room, I knew that the Coach House launch would be quite the affair, considering that Wayzgoose was one of the wildest parties I had been to in a long time.

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ReTrOspective: Looking Back at uTOpia in the Rob Ford Era

by Jason Freure

uTOpia: Towards a New Toronto was published in 2005, two years after David Miller’s election as mayor of Toronto, and he even wrote the forward. In this brief post, it’s not entirely possible to do justice to the dozens of ideas, visions, and histories in uTOpia, but the book is optimistic and imaginative about the city’s future.

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“My Literary Heart Is Still in Toronto:” Stuart Ross on His Patchy Squirrel Lit-Serv

by Jess Taylor

When I started this series of articles on the Toronto literary community, I was surprised by the diversity of the conversations, but one thing remained consistent, no matter which host was speaking: all series hosts relied on Stuart Ross’s Patchy Squirrel Lit-Serv to help promote their series.

“Everybody who is on Patchy is someone who specifically asked to be on the list,” Ross told me via Skype,

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Why Are We Surprised by David Gilmour?

by André Babyn

“You think your pain and your heartbreak are unprecedented in the history of the world, but then you read. It was books that taught me that the things that tormented me most were the very things that connected me with all the people who were alive, or who had ever been alive.”

― James Baldwin

The first and last time I purchased a novel by David Gilmour I was 18,