Category: Ephemera

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Marc di Saverio’s Sanatorium Songs

by Andrew Brobyn

Sanatorium Songs (Palimpsest Press), a debut from Hamilton’s own Marc di Saverio, conveys with its title the beautifully ironic yet aesthetically pleasing nature of a deeply disturbing brilliance. Even the cover image, a silver spoon holding barbed wire in milk like it’s cereal, does more than knock the sense out of you with a simple symbol—it also knocks the sense back into you with its crystalline honesty.

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Elections Canada: Politics on Our Bookshelves

by Tracy Kyncl

Toronto felt more political than ever this election season. After a tumultuous year for the city, its mayor, and its voting public, we’re all feeling conscious of the changing political landscape—whether that breeds excitement, anxiety, or outright dread. To better navigate our rocky political landscape, it’s now necessary to stay informed beyond the typical breaking news stories and catchy headlines,

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Toronto’s Story Planet:

by Kris Bone

Lately, it seems like kids aren’t picking up books. They may be reading on Kindles or computers, but actual books are on the decline—and recent studies suggest that this could be a bad sign for their literacy. According to a 2013 article from The Telegraph, the number of young people reading from screens has overtaken the number reading printed material for the first time in history.

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“We The North”

by Jason Freure

For businesses that rely on civic pride to generate popularity and revenue, Toronto’s self-denigrating attitude is toxic. Earlier this spring, the NBA’s Raptors came out with an ad that let Toronto be proud of itself, and not just the Toronto usually depicted on TV. Poet and sports commentator David McGimpsey wrote that “Canada’s racial imagining of sports has hockey all fathers and sons and car rides,

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Gilded Pages & Golden Thread:

by Tracy Kyncl

No matter how broad or “worldly” your taste may be, almost every reader has a preferred literary era that he/she habitually returns to. Modernist art, literature, film, and the Avant-garde have positively captivated my attention for quite some time and have also provided a number of aesthetic quandaries to muse over for years, it seems.

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HIJ Reading Series: “An Interesting Place in the Middle”

by Jess Taylor

HIJ is a brand-new house reading series in the Junction, headed up by Jay and Hazel Millar. Predominantly known for their publishing house, BookThug, the Millars have always been involved in creating new facets of literary community with their new reading series, a discussion-based speak-easy, The Toronto New School,

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Pages on Fire

by Jaclyn Qua-Hiansen

How can one advocate for more diverse representation in Canadian literature? For a group of young Ontario poets, it’s as simple as getting together twice a month and sharing their writing. “I find the group restorative,” says Tina Chu, a member of Brampton-based youth poetry collective Pages on Fire. “Racism now is much more subtle.

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Zygmunt Bauman Answers a Generation of Uncertainty

by E Martin Nolan

Tracy Kyncl’s post last week in the Crier struck a nerve. Between September and April—when my multiple teaching contracts expired—I wandered Toronto in a “very tired” state due mostly to my obligation to be “very serious about [my] work.” Work was killing me, and what life was left in me was largely swallowed up by the obligations I had made to the literary world—obligations I made so that I could force myself to keep contributing even though I had little time or energy to do so.

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This Program Contains Graphic Content

by Kris Bone

Descant, suffice it to say, has been around for a while. The magazine has been published now for five decades, and doesn’t show any signs of letting up. As they write on their website, they have proudly published work of an exceptional caliber for longer than many of my peers have been alive,