Category: Ephemera

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Kisses of Acadian and Gobs of Québécois

by Jason Freure

When Megan Draper sang “Zou Bisou Bisou” on Mad Men, American television took some bite out of the Parti québécois’s political rhetoric. Denise Duhamel’s poem opens with Jessica Paré’s iconic moment. “Zou Bisou Bisou” appears in Issue 24 of The Puritan and name drops a number of Anglo Canadian actors in Hollywood whose Canadian nationality may come as a surprise.

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Getting Back to the Poems—and to Humour

by E Martin Nolan

Daniel Scott Tysdal launched his poetry handbook, The Writing Moment a couple of days after Jason Guriel, Anita Lahey, and Zachariah Wells discussed matters of criticism at Ben McNally Books. The fact of the latter panel—its mere existence—is great.  We clearly need such a discussion, and The Puritan and Town Crier have enthusiastically taken part in that discussion over the past little while.

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Lost at Sea

by André Babyn

“Every man driven by a fixed idea is insane.”
—Joseph Conrad, Nostromo

John Campbell used to draw pictures for sad children, a surreal webcomic featuring sparse locales, stick-figures, silence, existential dread, and, true to its title, plenty of sadness. Despite its often dark subject matter,

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Street Culture

by Jason Freure

When urbanists and culture critics write about culture in the city, they often use cultural institutions as props for artistic life. David Mirvish’s “John Street Cultural Corridor” refers to the Mirvish Theatres, Scotiabank Cinema, the Four Season Centre for the Performing Arts, and the AGO north of Grange Park. These places tell you that the city values the arts and has a rich “cultural” life.

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“It’s A Mystery”

by Jason Freure

L.E. Sterling‘s Pluto’s Gate could have been awesome. The premise is a retelling of Persephone’s abduction. In 21st century Montreal, Persephone is Percy Tate, the daughter of a wiccan mother who lives out in the country and Rex, an indie rock star who lives in the Plateau. She falls into Hades through the cleaning closet of a St-Laurent club after her ex-boyfriend’s groupies give her something that’s probably rohypnol.

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This Ain’t Your Grandma’s Tea Party

by Tracy Kyncl

Reading can be a lonely passion. Rarely are you enjoying the same books as your friends at the same time. Needless to say that telling people about your favourite novels that they’ve never read can be painful and dull. Book clubs fortunately resolve the social conundrum of reading. They are a good way to share your beloved writers and expose yourself to titles you’ve never encountered with the added bonus of having people to discuss your literary adventures with. 

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Jigsaw Noir

by Jason Freure

Cory McCallum and Matthew Daley’s noir world starts off like any other: a city of dark towers in the middle of a heatwave, and something big is going on that nobody can solve but a rough-around-the-edges private investigator. The Pig Sleep features Mr. Monitor, a monitor lizard in a sleuthing hat,

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Why Bother, Bernardo Soares?

by André Babyn

The lyrics of alt-rock band Weezer are famously dreamy: they helped inaugurate a generation of teenagers who would rather fret and delay than act. Collectively these teens would come to be known as “emo,” short for “emotional”—in other words, a bunch of passive crybabies (not that there’s anything wrong with that). While attending all-female cover band Sheezer’s annual Hallowe’en show at Lee’s Palace last Thursday,

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ECW: A Little Out of the Ordinary

by Tracy Kyncl

With the International Festival of Authors on the horizon, it seems logical for presses to launch their wackiest and most unique books to grab readers’ attention. On October 21st, 2013 I attended the Wolsak and Wynn launch at The Steady where they were celebrating the release of some uncommon titles.