Category: Debate

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Luso, Lisbon, DISQUIET, Dzanc

by Oona Patrick

This is an exciting time for the Luso (Portuguese and Lusophone) writing community in the United States and Canada. Despite Maisonneuve’s gloomy “What’s Eating Little Portugal?”, 2013 saw the publication of Memória, the first anthology of Portuguese–Canadian writing, and Anthony De Sa’s second novel,

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Kill For Poetry

by André Babyn

Don’t kill for poetry. By that I mean don’t take a gun into your hands, like Mark David Chapman (or Robert John Bardo, or John Hinckley Jr.), and shoot John Lennon (or Rebecca Schaeffer, or Ronald Reagan, respectively) because you were moved by The Catcher in the Rye. Don’t become so affected by a work of art,

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The Burden and the Baggage

by E. Martin Nolan

The PUPPY FIGHT and What’s Beyond

A proposition: there are two levels operating simultaneously in the on-going, everlasting Great Canadian Poetry Review Debate (GCPRD): the baggage and the burden. We carry each in one hand. The baggage level is dominated by short spurts of energy directed toward members of the “opposite camp.”

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From the Vaults: PUPPY FIGHT!

by E. Martin Nolan

This article was originally published in the bad-old days of the original Town Crier, in the heat of the PUPPY FIGHT.

CORRECTION: This article has been modified as of January 4th, 2013. The penultimate paragraph originally stated, as if it were a fact, that Michael Lista “mostly reviews men.”

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Here be Dragons

by Phoebe Wang

Phoebe Wang discusses the Canadian literary critical scene of 2013 (and beyond!) in this year-in-review post.

Had I a choice, would I have picked 2013 to begin my stint as a reviewer in Canada? I might have preferred 913—a year dominated by saints’ lives, riddles, saw-toothed monsters and their mothers.

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Hiding in Plain Sight

by André Babyn

Two weeks ago I talked about the success of Catching Fire and how money and inertia, not ability or appeal, influences unbalanced gender roles in Hollywood. Speaking of money, have you seen how those who made licensing agreements with Lionsgate, the studio that made Catching Fire, have been using it?

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The News vs. Poetic Language

by Lisa Pasold

Lisa Pasold is a poet, novelist and journalist. Her collection Any Bright Horse was reviewed in Issue XXI of The Puritan, and her poem The Line at the Ambassador Bridge will appear in Issue XXIV, due out this winter, as part of a special supplement on the US-Canadian border.

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Rob Ford Grotesque

by André Babyn

Thursday on this site E Martin Nolan wondered whether there was such a thing as the “Rob Ford sublime.” He asked this question because he found that while he disliked Ford, he couldn’t look away from him: explaining that, looking at Ford, even “while your neck jerks back, [your] eyes are even more locked in.” Nolan’s statement reminded me of a moment in Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels,

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Beyond the Rob Ford Sublime

by E. Martin Nolan

“What are commonly and ever more often perceived as ‘public issues’ are private problems of public figures. The time-honoured question of democratic politics—how useful or detrimental is the way public figures exercise their public duties to the welfare and well-being of their subjects/electors?—has fallen by the board, beckoning to public interests in good society,