Category: Debate

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The Myth of Multiculturalism

by E Martin Nolan

In The Puritan’s recent “Littered T.O.” supplement, Amy Lavender Harris claims that “multiculturalism is Toronto’s strongest cultural myth.” She is right. Still, it’s difficult to picture just how such a myth would be constructed. That multiculturalism is Toronto’s defining characteristic is beyond doubt. The New York Times echoed this reality in a popular piece praising “Toronto’s Ethnic Buffet.”

The question becomes: how can multiculturalism be a cultural myth?

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Two Cents More on Trigger Warnings

by Nicole R. Grimaldi

For an old thrill, I pulled Stanley Kubrick’s A Clockwork Orange out of my closet and sat watching it for the first time in years with a big glass of wine. While the film is, cinematographically speaking, a delight to behold—vividly dystopian, exhilaratingly turbulent, chromatically noir—I will always prefer Anthony Burgess’s more modest novella,

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Book City Annex Closes

by Jason Freure

Toronto’s literary scene moved out of the Annex years ago. Dennis Lee, bpNichol, Gwendolyn MacEwan, and many others wrote about and lived in the Annex during its heyday as a neighbourhood of students, writers, and artists. By the 1990s, Warren Dunford was mocking the crowds of young writers typing away at Future Bakery as if the Annex’s mythic geography would rub greatness onto their own manuscripts.

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Changing the Conversation

by Ryan Pratt

“A discussion of mysticism usually begins with the admission that adequate discussion is impossible,” said American scholar Holmes Welch, and it’s a quotation that struck me when a panel discussion entitled “What We Talk About When We Talk About Poetry” crossed my desk and made its way to Hamilton.

Like mysticism, which over centuries gathers footnotes and commentaries that distort the original size and meaning of a text,

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Poets, Hug it Out

by E Martin Nolan

A poet I know recently had a family emergency. To keep everyone in the loop, he posted updates on Facebook. Eventually the danger passed and it looked like everything would be OK. A great thing. After, I was struck by the comment thread, at once familiar and not. Another thread filled by poets chiming in.

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Adaptation and Expectation

by Tracy Kyncl

For many years I have been fascinated by the notion of adaptation. Adaptation, more than any mise-en-scène or editing trick, incenses moviegoers with critical bloodlust and turns the most amateur viewer into a self-proclaimed expert on literature-to-film metamorphoses. Remember when the Harry Potter films came out and every other person you talked to had qualms with the directors for leaving out scenes from the novel,

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Arts-washing

by Jason Freure

Bruce Katz, Director of the Metropolitan Policy Program at the Brookings Institution thinks that 2014 will be a watershed year for Innovation Districts. The Innovation District is a cluster of R&D institutions and tech firms centralized in one urban district. Typically start-up companies and spin-offs open their offices nearby. One theory of urban innovation argues that geographical proximity makes professional networking easier and promotes the cross dissemination of ideas.

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Design Matters

by André Babyn

Usually when magazines hold contests with huge entry fees that include the cost of a year’s subscription, they do it to drum up interest and to expose a larger audience to their work in an effort to hook them and get renewals. It’s a pretty straightforward tactic, and one that doesn’t require a lot of examining.

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Luso, Lisbon, DISQUIET, Dzanc

by Oona Patrick

This is an exciting time for the Luso (Portuguese and Lusophone) writing community in the United States and Canada. Despite Maisonneuve’s gloomy “What’s Eating Little Portugal?”, 2013 saw the publication of Memória, the first anthology of Portuguese–Canadian writing, and Anthony De Sa’s second novel,