Category: Books

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Canadian Summer Reading: A List

by Jason Freure

My Canadian summer reading lists have almost always been a game of catch-up. Summer means four straight months of binging on all those titles launched during the school year, and in case you missed them, too, here’s a look at the (mostly) Canadian titles that have crossed my bedside table for The Puritan’s Town Crier.

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Embracing the Blatantly Poetic: Lisa Pasold Edition

by E. Martin Nolan

It’s not hard to place Lisa Pasold’s Any Bright Horse within certain prevalent trends in recent poetry. The book props up bits of linearity, then lightly abandons them and convolutes them with one another. In the same way it tries on verse shapes and forms. That latter trait is possible because Pasold’s forms denote more a way of thinking,

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As It is in Its Reviews: Anne Carson’s Red Doc>, Pt. 2

by E. Martin Nolan

In his National Post review of Anne Carson’s Red Doc> Michael Lista writes, “this isn’t really poetry … it’s prose.” Like Jason Guriel, whose Poetry review I’ve already touched on, Lista argues that Anne Carson’s verse formations are “arbitrary” and contain “no formal meaning.” Lista also claims that the only definite ramification of Carson’s two-inch-wide centre-justified verses is that with them the book is longer than if they were,

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Beth Follett on Jan Zwicky’s The Book of Frog: A Way of Discussing the World

by Phoebe Wang

With a book such as Jan Zwicky’s recent The Book of Frog, released by Newfoundland’s Pedlar Press, many readers will wonder how it came about. The book is slim, perfect-bound, beautifully printed, has a pleasing light-green cover, and is adorned with images and diagrams within. The short prose work also marks a shift from the works of poetry and philosophy that Zwicky has published during her long,

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Short Story Month – Taking Advice from Usher

by Andrew F. Sullivan

It is Short Story Month and we will all be paying lip service to that fact. There will be screeds bemoaning how collections are ignored by popular readers, celebrations of online publishers revitalizing the form and loud whispers about traditional publishers abandoning collections in favour of novels again and again. Each year it seems to be a perpetual underdog story and the narrative rarely changes.

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Treading in the Wake of Nicholas Hoare, and Learning from that Venerable Store

by Shaun A. Hogan

Nicholas Hoare, that embarrassment of writerly riches, is gone. And it’s a shame. The store had an air of manicured style, which is to say it was really nice inside—and while it’s heartening to know that its closure was speeded by Mr. Hoare’s retirement and not by rent hikes or tax bills,