Month: August 2015

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Interview: Michael Longley

by Aoife Walsh

To close our series on Irish literature this month, I thought it fitting to bring you the un-rhyming words of the Irish poet who was the 2015 International Winner of Canada’s Griffin Poetry Prize, Michael Longley. The Stairwell (2014), is his tenth collection of poetry and comes in the aftermath of the death of his twin brother,

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The Oddball Narrators of 21st Century Irish Literature

by Caitriona Lally

In recent years, major economic changes in Ireland have given rise to a host of oddball narrators in Irish literature, outsiders who don’t fit into boom-time society and who remain alienated during the bust. Prior to this, Irish writers have often produced an outsider literature, with stalwarts such as James Joyce and Samuel Beckett writing their most famous works about Ireland from outside the country.

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The “Other” Irish Literary Canon

by Samuel K Brick

The Long Gaze Back is the first all-female anthology of Irish short stories in 14 years and is therefore timely and well overdue. Edited by the broadcaster, critic, and journalist Sinéad Gleeson, and published by New Island, the collection carries stories by emerging (EM Reapy,

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Tracking Down Jennifer Johnston

by Jennifer Ryan

Contrary to the dour news reports, surveys, and statistics of late, I have been a full-fledged member of the Irish workforce for the past eight years. Perhaps even more contrary is the fact that my work has centred on Irish writing and publishing for most of that time. For three years I wrote the monthly book pages for IMAGE,

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We Americans (of Irish Descent)

by E Martin Nolan

I grew up well aware I was Irish-American. The hyphen was like a pride IV drip from which I could suck an ancestry into—no, from!—my blood. It was far older and richer than what American TV could offer, and alive. I was more than just another white guy: Catholic churches, schools and camps; Irish flags,

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Interview: Danielle McLaughlin and Andrew Meehan

by Aoife Walsh

In the second of two parts, I caught up with two previous contributors to The South Circular, the digital magazine of short stories which I’ve published since March 2012. Danielle McLaughlin’s story, “Five Days to Polling Day,” published in Issue 8 in December 2013, was nominated for a Writing.ie Short Story of the Year Award as part of the Bord Gáis Irish Book Awards in 2014.

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Interview: EM Reapy and Adrian Duncan

by Aoife Walsh

In the first of two parts, I caught up with two previous contributors to The South Circular, the digital magazine of short stories which I’ve published since March 2012. Adrian’s story “Chicken Lane Manifesto” was the first submission we ever received and was published in issue 1 in March 2012.

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The Bohemyth Magazine

by Michael Naghten Shanks

In the summer of 2010, having just completed a Bachelor’s degree in English at Trinity College Dublin, I found myself in a similar situation to many twenty-somethings at the time: I had a good (if not economically marketable) education and was faced with the prospect of emigration. Whether it was hubris, fear, or some complex mix of emotions,

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Tramp Press Editor on Irish Independent Publishing

by Sarah Davis-Goff

As co-founder and co-publisher of Tramp Press, it’s my duty to do many things I like—reading unsolicited manuscripts, finding new talent, selling the crap out of our titles—and a very few things that I do not like. Chief amongst these is speaking at launches.

My co-founder Lisa Coen and I are ballsy as hell in pretty much everything we do: having taste,

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The New Irish Diaspora Poets

by Ailbhe Darcy

In 1866, the story goes, the Irish invaded Canada. The plan was to grab land along the St. Lawrence River, then use it to annoy the British so much they would cede us independence back home. Despite being smack-bang in the category of “that’s so crazy, it might just work!” it did not work. The Irish have never stopped quietly invading Canada.