Month: March 2015

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Author Notes: Annik Adey-Babinski

by Annik Adey-Babinski

Annik Adey-Babinski contributed her poem, “On MC Hammer’s Birthday” to The Puritan Issue 28The Town Crier asked Adey-Babinski several questions about her poem, and she answers them here.

Town Crier: Does your poem or story have an interesting origin story/compositional history you’d like to share?

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Tashme

by Michael Prior

“The government prohibited Japanese Canadians from possessing and making maps.”
—Kirsten Emiko McAllister, Terrain of Memory

Like the layers of colour in an apartment repainted before each new tenant, places accumulate one atop the other, suggesting the mental strata on to which we map our personal, social, and historical claims.

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Writing Detroit: The Past is not Pretty

by Cal Freeman

There are perils involved in writing about a place like Warrendale, my childhood neighborhood in West Detroit and the topic of my first book of poems, Brother of Leaving.  Nostalgia is a temptation.  I’m sure I also open myself up to the charge of engaging in “ruin porn,”a banal and malleable term seemingly applicable to anyone who chooses to write about,

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A Walk Through the City

by André Forget

After Kemal Basmacı, the protagonist of Orhan Pamuk’s 2009 novel The Museum of Innocence, has his heart broken, he starts to compulsively wander the streets of Istanbul. At first, he is searching for Füsun, the lover who has abandoned him, but as he strays farther and farther from the comfortable neighbourhoods of his youth and early adulthood,

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Rebecca Mead and Abstract Place

by Julienne Isaacs

Middlemarch is not a real place. It’s the town at the heart of George Eliot’s breathtakingly long novel, a study of a “web” of characters living in the English Midlands between the years 1830 and 1832, the tail end of the Georgian era and the beginning of the Victorian. The plot of Middlemarch is complex,

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Interview: Sue Goyette

by André Forget

Sue Goyette is a Halifax-based poet. Her most recent collection, Ocean, was a finalist for the Griffin Poetry prize in 2014.

André Forget: You grew up in Montreal, but currently live in Nova Scotia and are quite involved in the literature scene there. How have those two very different places shaped your sensibilities as a writer?

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Canadian Literature After Nationalism

by André Forget

It was with some trepidation that, just over a week ago, I wandered into the AGO’s Jackman Theatre to attend 20 Years of Writing Thru Race: Then and Now. This trepidation was caused by several factors: not only am I a white, straight, middle-class man whose ancestors were quite busily involved in the colonization of this country and several others,

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“Imagining Impractical Ideas About Bodies”

by Phoebe Wang

As part of the Town Crier’s ongoing exploration of place in Canadian Writing, Phoebe Wang conducted an email interview with Lucas Crawford, the 2015 Critic-In-Residence for the Canadian Women in the Literary Arts. Lucas Crawford is a poet, performer and scholar who has written on transgender and literature, fat studies, and queer identity politics.

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Interview: John K Samson

by Adam Klassen Bartel

The defiantly Winnipeg-based poet and songwriter John K. Samson is known best for his work as singer for The Weakerthans. He also serves as the managing editor for Arbeiter Ring Press.

Adam Klassen Bartel: In listening to your music I noticed, especially in your last album,

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CanLit: From Calcified to Cape Town

by André Forget

If you look up Canadian literature on Wikipedia, you get what at first seems to be a sardonic little truism: “Canadian literature is literature originating from Canada.” Of course it is, you think—what else would it be? Scratch the surface even a little, though, and this truism turns up a whole mess of questions.