Month: April 2014

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“You Need To Take Everyone In”:

by Jess Taylor

Alexandra Oliver understands people. As a poet and author of Meeting the Tormentors in Safeway,  she’s developed a keen ear for other voices and represents people from all walks of life: the preschooler, the old man, the rebel, or even strangers in the laundromat.

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The Crier Presents: The Writing Moment

by Daniel Scott Tydsal

Editor’s Note: In an effort to help us expand our audience and revenue streams, this thrilling third instalment of The Writing Moment (poems by the first winners, Gary Barwin, A.G. Pasquella, Maggie Thistle, and Munira Fatehi, can be found here), teams The Town Crier up with the Las “Expanding Art” Vegas Experience,

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Poetry, Prose, & Taking It Shift by Shift

by E Martin Nolan

It’s a busy time for past-Puritan authors: no fewer than 10 of their books are being published this spring. So we decided to check in on them and ask them one question each. First up: Chris Hutchinson, Peter Norman, Suzannah Showler, and Mike Spry. Stay tuned for more.

Chris Hutchinson’s A Brief History of the Short-Lived was reviewed in Issue 19 of The Puritan.

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Ready to Launch: Buckrider Books

by Kris Bone

I’ll be honest with you: I wish I could avoid writing about the literary community/scene here this week. It’s been a subject we’ve given play to almost non-stop in the past month or two, for better or worse. Unfortunately (or fortunately), it would be all but impossible to avoid discussing the massive community showing at last Wednesday’s official launch for Buckrider Books,

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Author Notes: Sonia Di Placido

by Sonia Di Placido

Recent Puritan author Sonia Di Placido discusses the origins of her poem “Hands—On World,” which was featured in Issue 24: Winter 2014.

A Quiet & Defiant [In Canto] Incantation to “Hands—On World”

This poem maintains a variety of inter-textual and personal contexts,

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“To Me, All Poetry is Political”:

by Tracy Kyncl

It’s only been two weeks into National Poetry Month and Toronto is in a flurry. Awash with events and brimming with excitement, bards, readers, and critics have busied themselves buying debut collections or reflecting on the place of poetry in their lives.

As I’ve immersed myself in the hubbub I’ve noticed that poetry,

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“Stretching the Space of Realism”:

by Nicole R. Grimaldi

Author Kathryn Kuitenbrouwer discusses enchantment, realism, and the local politics of her newest novel All The Broken Things. The following is a teaser of a much longer, more in depth conversation scheduled for publication in Issue 26: Summer 2014 of The Puritan.

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Kisses of Acadian and Gobs of Québécois

by Jason Freure

When Megan Draper sang “Zou Bisou Bisou” on Mad Men, American television took some bite out of the Parti québécois’s political rhetoric. Denise Duhamel’s poem opens with Jessica Paré’s iconic moment. “Zou Bisou Bisou” appears in Issue 24 of The Puritan and name drops a number of Anglo Canadian actors in Hollywood whose Canadian nationality may come as a surprise.

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Getting Back to the Poems—and to Humour

by E Martin Nolan

Daniel Scott Tysdal launched his poetry handbook, The Writing Moment a couple of days after Jason Guriel, Anita Lahey, and Zachariah Wells discussed matters of criticism at Ben McNally Books. The fact of the latter panel—its mere existence—is great.  We clearly need such a discussion, and The Puritan and Town Crier have enthusiastically taken part in that discussion over the past little while.

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“Anyone Can Write Themselves into Visibility, but Who Reads It?”

by Jess Taylor

Oakland poet Stephanie Young, who recently released Ursula or University with Krupskaya, answered questions for The Town Crier based on her essay, “In Which Metaphors For Poetry Communities, and For Writing About Them, Abound.” Last month, we featured Part One of the interview.