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“Seeing Splits” and Writing “Humanness”: Questions for Doyali Islam on Concept, Form, and Process

by E Martin Nolan

The following piece appears as part of the month-long series “Conscientious Conceptualism and Poetic Practice” on the blog, curated by guest editor Andy Verboom.

E Martin Nolan: In this month’s series on ‘conscientious conceptualism,’ one of the focuses has been the consequences of the formal choices that poets make. That brings me to your ‘parallel poems.’ In an interview in Arc Magazine’s Newsletter, you describe them this way:

The ‘parallel poems’ emerge from tension and—I hope—create their own tension on the page through the juxtaposition of two geographically-based poetic halves or sub-poems.


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Conceptualism in the Resistance

by Jacqueline Valencia

The following piece appears as part of the month-long series “Conscientious Conceptualism and Poetic Practice” on the blog, curated by guest editor Andy Verboom.

Since 2015, I’ve been asked to write and talk about cultural appropriation in conceptual poetry. These requests began after I wrote a few blog posts in response to conceptual poets who had problematically appropriated work that year.


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Speaking of “Lyric Conceptualism”: Space, Time, and the Travelling “I”

by Kevin Shaw and Andy Verboom

The following piece appears as part of the month-long series “Conscientious Conceptualism and Poetic Practice” on the blog, curated by guest editor Andy Verboom.

Andy Verboom: When I think about the relations among conceptual, lyric, and formal poetic practices, I have a foggy Venn diagram in mind. Certain techniques,


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White and Conceptual

by John Nyman

The following piece appears as part of the month-long series “Conscientious Conceptualism and Poetic Practice” on the blog, curated by guest editor Andy Verboom.

What is conceptualism? For at least the last few years, it has been difficult to answer this question without betraying a certain bias, or at least a certain perspective or ‘take.’ For many,